Tag Archives: Yale

still majoring in mismanagement

Last fall, I blogged about possible ways to disrupt and improve our vastly overpriced and underachieving higher education system. One of my bright ideas went as follows:

[T]here’s no reason [Harvard] shouldn’t build more campuses in other locations, increasing enrollment even more. If its product is so great, why not scale it out?

Fast forward to this week when I opened the latest Barron’s and discovered that Harvard’s biggest rival is already doing just that:

Yale University has done something that no other Ivy League school has attempted: built a new version of itself halfway around the world, in Singapore.

I believe we’ve got things backwards in this country when it comes to higher education. In my opinion, a university’s reputation shouldn’t be based on how exclusive and expensive it is–that is, how much it costs and how few young people it educates. I think we should reverse that equation and judge our elite institutions by how many quality educations they provide, and at what value. Yale’s experiment in Singapore is a good first step in the right direction (even if it is in China), but it’s not addressing the biggest problem in higher education today:

It costs too damn much!

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