Tag Archives: nflx

orange might be the new red: original content could easily bleed netflix dry

I recently joined a group of other money managers for a meeting at Neflix’s (NFLX) Los Gatos, California headquarters. The company’s IR rep gave a concise 30-minute business overview, followed by 30 minutes of questions. I’ve never considered investing in Netflix and I probably never will. As a rule, I don’t buy or short popular, high-profile companies. But I have to say, I came away from that presentation more than a little skeptical about Netflix’s future prospects.

The company’s subscription service is a good, if not great business and its user growth has been impressive, but NFLX is an extremely expensive stock by almost any metric. Even after its recent selloff, its market capitalization still tops $40 billion vs. $6.8 billion in estimated 2015 revenues and roughly zero free cash flow in both 2015 and 2016. Its high valuation isn’t what worries me, though. Today about ten percent of the content available on Netflix is either licensed or created by the company. It plans to increase that number to fifty percent. To say this is an extremely risky move would be an understatement.

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once bitten: will the “FANGs” keep feasting?

Jim Cramer has been talking up what he calls the “FANG” stocks again: Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Netflix (NFLX) and Google (GOOG). Cramer has touted these stocks for several years now, and for good reason. They’ve far outpaced the market in that time. Throw in a second world-beating “A” stock, Apple (AAPL), and the five companies are worth a staggering $1.8 trillion in combined market capitalization, or roughly 17 percent of the NASDAQ composite and 9 percent of the S&P 500.

There’s no doubt about it: if you haven’t been in these stocks over the last few years, it’s been damn near impossible to beat the indexes. (And God help anyone who dared to short them.) But, past results aside, will the FANG stocks continue to bite off big gains in the future? Investors certainly seem to think so. Facebook’s early struggles as a public company seem like ancient history. Last week, Google added almost $60 billion in market cap in a single day and Netflix popped ten percent on strong user growth. As for Amazon, it just keeps heading higher and higher, profits be damned.

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