Tag Archives: Harvard

the rich get richer, again

Last week NY hedge fund manager John Paulson took a lot of grief for his record $400 million gift to Harvard University, his business school alma mater. Personally, I admire Mr. Paulson for supporting higher education. It is a noble gesture. He could have spent that cash on private jets or his own third world island nation. But Mr. Paulson made a glaring mistake: he gave his money to a school that does not need, and does not deserve, that money–and the $200 million or so he’ll save on taxes would do America and the state of New York more good than Harvard University.

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still majoring in mismanagement

Last fall, I blogged about possible ways to disrupt and improve our vastly overpriced and underachieving higher education system. One of my bright ideas went as follows:

[T]here’s no reason [Harvard] shouldn’t build more campuses in other locations, increasing enrollment even more. If its product is so great, why not scale it out?

Fast forward to this week when I opened the latest Barron’s and discovered that Harvard’s biggest rival is already doing just that:

Yale University has done something that no other Ivy League school has attempted: built a new version of itself halfway around the world, in Singapore.

I believe we’ve got things backwards in this country when it comes to higher education. In my opinion, a university’s reputation shouldn’t be based on how exclusive and expensive it is–that is, how much it costs and how few young people it educates. I think we should reverse that equation and judge our elite institutions by how many quality educations they provide, and at what value. Yale’s experiment in Singapore is a good first step in the right direction (even if it is in China), but it’s not addressing the biggest problem in higher education today:

It costs too damn much!

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majoring in mismanagement

I glanced at a recent issue of the Stanford alumni magazine the other day. It featured an interview with former school president Gerhard Casper and an excerpt from his book on “addressing the challenges of higher education.” The piece was underwhelming, to put it mildly. There was the usual pabulum about school rankings, measuring outcomes, and fostering diversity. But there wasn’t a single word about the biggest problem facing higher education today:

It costs too damn much!

Our nation’s universities, public and private, have crushed an entire generation with debt. All told, young adults owe more than a trillion dollars in student loans. That’s a huge drag on our economic growth. And where is all that borrowed money going (besides the Wall Street banks that underwrite many of the loans)? It’s propping up one of the most backwards and wasteful industries in the world: academia.

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