Category Archives: Europe

the year of the gun

Successful stockpicking is all about identifying profitable inefficiencies in consensus expectations for a given company or industry—and as much as I hate to say it, the mind-numbing spate of violence we have been living through this year probably makes the gun business one of the most undervalued sectors in the market today.

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bailout fever is still raging

I do not short debt. But, on paper at least, shorting the sovereign debt of poorly managed European nations not named Greece sure seems like a great investment right about now. Aside from the negligible cost of the coupon, the downside to shorting the bonds of places like Portugal, Spain, and Italy seems to be almost nil. We’re talking about heavily indebted countries with aging populations and staggering unemployment, and yet, thanks largely to QE measures, their bond yields are shockingly low. This is clearly an unsustainable situation. QE will have to end eventually and if EU leaders finally develop a backbone, yields might return to double-digit levels more quickly.

Geez. I’m almost talking myself into this idea. Then again, it’s impossible to predict when (or if) the global pandemic of bailout fever will finally end.

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adios, auf weidersehen, au revoir: why europe is (literally) dying out

Despite the unendingly grim economic news out of the euro zone, most major European stock markets have shown robust growth over the last year. The German DAX is up over 32 percent since June of 2012. The Swiss Exchange is close behind at almost 30 percent growth over the same time period, and the Euronext 100 and CAC 40 have both risen by almost 25 percent. Heck, even the Athens Stock Exchange seems to have temporarily risen from the dead. It’s up more than 77 percent in the last twelve months.

So is it time to put aside our fears and jump into this rally? I have three answers: no, hell no, and don’t you dare.

Europe is a dead-continent-walking. These short term gains notwithstanding, European stocks may very well be the biggest value trap in the history of capitalism–though the reasons why might surprise you. It’s not just because of the region’s low-to-no economic growth, crushingly high debt levels, and disastrous austerity policies. Europe is “going to zero” in a different, more fundamental area, as well.

It’s running out of people.

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