Monthly Archives: June 2015

a twitter buyout? don’t hold your breath

We’re in the middle of a buyout frenzy for the ages. Every day brings news of another mega deal, either real or imagined. On Sunday, Cigna rebuffed Anthem’s $47 billion offer. This failure-to-merge is a rare exception. Many large and established companies have successfully gobbled up other large and established companies in recent weeks, especially in the tech space. In March, NXP Semiconductor bought Austin-based Freescale for almost $12 billion. Singapore’s Avago paid a whopping $37 billion for Broadcom a few months later, and Intel recently completed its $16.7 billion acquisition of Altera.

This merger mania is partly a product of record low interest rates around the globe. Profitable, cash rich firms can sell bonds with vanishingly low interest rates, making major acquisitions relatively easy (and cheap) to finance. Furthermore, the US tax code encourages firms to borrow money, as interest costs are treated as a deductible business expense. Add it all up and it’s little wonder that every company out there is starting to seem like a viable takeover candidate.

But let’s not get carried away.

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what if growth disappoints again?

Late last month the Commerce Department revised first quarter economic growth from its initially tepid .2 percent estimate to a putrid negative .7 percent. There was no shortage of excuses for these results. The West Coast port slowdown was cited, as was the usual whipping boy, severe winter weather. In April, CNBC analyzed 30 years of GDP data and showed that first quarter growth persistently underperforms expectations. Whatever the reason, or reasons, the fact remains that –seven years in–we are still mired in the slowest post-recession recovery in US history.

And, to paraphrase Humphrey Bogart, things are never so bad that they can’t get worse.

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trend investing: late is better than never

Buying into secular trends can be a powerful investment strategy. It can also be very tricky. I’ve missed my share of winners over the years by talking myself into believing that a trend had peaked or that stocks benefitting from a secular shift were already overbought. In fact, I’ve learned (from often painful experience) to embrace a better-late-than-never mentality when it comes to trend investing, even if it means buying seemingly “expensive” stocks.

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the rich get richer, again

Last week NY hedge fund manager John Paulson took a lot of grief for his record $400 million gift to Harvard University, his business school alma mater. Personally, I admire Mr. Paulson for supporting higher education. It is a noble gesture. He could have spent that cash on private jets or his own third world island nation. But Mr. Paulson made a glaring mistake: he gave his money to a school that does not need, and does not deserve, that money–and the $200 million or so he’ll save on taxes would do America and the state of New York more good than Harvard University.

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who cares what christine lagarde thinks about interest rates?

Another week has brought yet another much-publicized call for the Federal Reserve to delay raising interest rates. Yesterday, the International Monetary Fund opined that the Fed should hold off on a rate hike until 2016.

Give me a break.

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